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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 129-137

Intranasal dexmedetomidine versus midazolam in preoperative sedation for noncomplex pediatric congenital cardiac surgeries


Department of Anaesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria, El Azerita Square, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Hebaallah M Abdelmoneim
Department of Anaesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alexandria, El Azerita Square, 21131
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2356-9115.193411

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Background & objectives Preoperative anxiety can be reduced pharmacologically. Midazolam is a benzodiazepine potent sedative, hypnotic, anaesthetic agent with strong anticonvulsant properties but does not have analgesic properties. The administration of intranasal lidocaine prior to the use of intranasal midazolam has been reported to be beneficial in reducing the burning sensation from intranasal midazolam. Dexmedetomidine, the newest sedative, is a highly selective α2 adrenergic agonist. Materials and methods Sixty children, aged between 3–12 years. The children were divided into two groups of 30 each. Thirty minutes before induction, Group-D (n=30) received intranasal Dexmedetomidine and Group M+L received intranasal midazolam preceeded by single puff on intranasal lidocaine spray 1% in each nostril. Results Children who were premedicated with intranasal dexmedetomidine had lower sedation (MOAA/S Scale) scores, and easier child-parent separation than children who received intranasal midazolam. In addition to lower BIS measurements at the OR, after face mask application and after IV cannulation. Conclusion Intranasal Dexmedetomidine can be used effectively and safely as a preanaesthetic medication in children undergoing repair of non-complex congenital cardiac defects.


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